fuckyeahpixivranking:

「戦艦棲姫」/「黑盒子」
anachronisticfairytales:

Nadezhda Illarionova

anachronisticfairytales:

Nadezhda Illarionova

(via jlroses)

buzzbuzzstuff:

Totem by Sarah Yeoman Watercolor

buzzbuzzstuff:

Totem by Sarah Yeoman Watercolor

(via jlroses)

indiscordium:

Weng Ziyang

indiscordium:

Weng Ziyang

(via jlroses)

(Source: theperfectcell, via heiwarish)

(Source: pushthemovement, via heiwarish)

rebel6:

by Odobenus

Marilyn Monroe photographed by John Florea, 1951

Could she read?

Marilyn Monroe photographed by John Florea, 1951

Could she read?

(Source: missmonroes, via vintagegal)

wildcat2030:

Tomorrow’s Fastest Cars Could Be Covered in Morphable Skins - Wrinkles aren’t usually an aspect of the future that gets people excited. But fast cars are. And someday we might have cars that can accelerate more quickly, and efficiently, by morphing their surface texture through the mechanics of wrinkling. Speed-enhancing body wrinkles on your Tesla are still years away, but researchers at MIT have created what could be the first step: a ball with morphable surface texture. They were able to get their creation, which they call a smorph (short for smart morphable surface), to wrinkle into a dimpled pattern similar to a golf ball’s, with similar aerodynamic properties. Smorphs are sort of like raisins. As the soft inside of a grape dries out, the stiffer skin can’t shrink with it. Instead, it develops wrinkles to conform around the reduced volume. Smorphs don’t dry out (they also make terrible snacks), but the volume of a smorph can be similarly reduced by sucking air out of its hollow core. That core is surrounded by different polymers: a thick, squishy layer covered by relatively stiff outer skin. As the core shrinks, the squishy layer is soft enough to contract smoothly, but the skin is forced to wrinkle. The trick is controlling exactly how a smorph wrinkles. MIT mechanical engineer Pedro Reis, the material’s lead inventor, studies how wrinkling and other types of structural failures can be made useful. He says the first step toward controlling the wrinkling of a smorph is making the squishy base layer thick enough that the sphere doesn’t crumple like a ping pong ball. From there, they can tune the pattern of the wrinkles by changing the thickness of the outer skin. Dimples form when the skin is one-tenth to one-hundredth of the sphere’s radius. (via Tomorrow’s Fastest Cars Could Be Covered in Morphable Skins | Autopia | WIRED)

wildcat2030:

Tomorrow’s Fastest Cars Could Be Covered in Morphable Skins
-
Wrinkles aren’t usually an aspect of the future that gets people excited. But fast cars are. And someday we might have cars that can accelerate more quickly, and efficiently, by morphing their surface texture through the mechanics of wrinkling. Speed-enhancing body wrinkles on your Tesla are still years away, but researchers at MIT have created what could be the first step: a ball with morphable surface texture. They were able to get their creation, which they call a smorph (short for smart morphable surface), to wrinkle into a dimpled pattern similar to a golf ball’s, with similar aerodynamic properties. Smorphs are sort of like raisins. As the soft inside of a grape dries out, the stiffer skin can’t shrink with it. Instead, it develops wrinkles to conform around the reduced volume. Smorphs don’t dry out (they also make terrible snacks), but the volume of a smorph can be similarly reduced by sucking air out of its hollow core. That core is surrounded by different polymers: a thick, squishy layer covered by relatively stiff outer skin. As the core shrinks, the squishy layer is soft enough to contract smoothly, but the skin is forced to wrinkle. The trick is controlling exactly how a smorph wrinkles. MIT mechanical engineer Pedro Reis, the material’s lead inventor, studies how wrinkling and other types of structural failures can be made useful. He says the first step toward controlling the wrinkling of a smorph is making the squishy base layer thick enough that the sphere doesn’t crumple like a ping pong ball. From there, they can tune the pattern of the wrinkles by changing the thickness of the outer skin. Dimples form when the skin is one-tenth to one-hundredth of the sphere’s radius. (via Tomorrow’s Fastest Cars Could Be Covered in Morphable Skins | Autopia | WIRED)

(Source: jrugs, via tokyotk)

scifi-fantasy-horror:

by VITALIY SMYK

officialswagmom:

hes reading the biology book upside down 

(Source: slimegovi, via izziesworldofizzie)